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Marine Section Meetings

Third International Marine Conservation Congress
Glasgow, Scotland
14-19 August 2014

To conserve the world's oceans we must go beyond science, and use it to inform policy and management, to ultimately catalyze change. Hosted by the Marine Section of the Society for Conservation Biology,IMCC3 brings together conservation professionals and students to develop new and powerful tools to further marine conservation science and policy.

Learn more at the IMCC3 website.

 


The 1st International Marine Conservation Think Tank
Auckland, New Zealand
2-5 December 2011

The Marine Section hosted a special set of marine themed focus groups, designed to address specific problems on marine conservation issues of special concern for the southern hemisphere. These meetings were held immediately prior to the SCB global meeting in Auckland, New Zealand

Fourteen meetings took place:

Antarctic issues

  • Predicting ecosystem change in Antarctic ecosystems

Reefs in crisis  

  • Social resilience and adaptation in coral reef communities

MPA effectiveness

  • The role of prioritisation in Marine Protected Area designation
  • Quantifying the effectiveness of community-managed marine protected areas in Oceania
  • Big Ocean Network: A research agenda and science dissemination strategy for large scale MPAs
  • Sea change: a campaign to increase support and activism for marine protected areas
  • Pelagic ecosystems and the management of MPAs

Deep sea ecosystems        

  • Deep-sea coral research to enhance conservation

Marine wildlife tourism and small, isolated populations

  • Steps to success in research and management of by-catch and other marine conservation issues
  • Marine mammal/tourism interactions

High seas governance

  • Science requirements for effective High Seas governance

Sustainable fisheries

  • Fisheries management: the science, conservation and management

Other  

  • Improving global marine biodiversity assessments
  • Ocean governance in Aotearoa New Zealand

The Marine Section of the Society for Conservation Biology hosted the Second International Marine Conservation Congress (IMCC2) from 14-18 May 2011 at the Victoria Convention Centre, British Columbia, Canada.

Themes for this conference included:

  • Innovative techniques and technology for marine conservation;
  • The Human dimension for marine conservation;
  • Advancing marine conservation through International treaties;
  • The changing Arctic;
  • Marine conservation awareness and outreach;
  • Climate and the changing oceans;
  • Sustainable fisheries and aquaculture;
  • Conservation at the land/sea interface; and
  • Effective Marine Spatial Planning

During interactive symposia and workshops, we challenged participants to go beyond one-way communication. Each of these sessions addressed specific topics within major themes and developed innovative solutions to current conservation challenges. Symposium organizers invited a select group of speakers and devised creative ways to facilitate discussion. Workshops consisted of multi-disciplinary teams focused on crafting policy and management recommendations, briefings, conservation action plans, white papers or peer-reviewed publications.

The Congress opened on May 14th with an IMCC & COMPASS reception where attendees got a taste for what’s to come at IMCC. Leading scientists kicked off the conference with insightful overviews of the new science and big ideas we’ll be exploring. The event concluded on the evening of May 18th with a closing party at the Strathcona Hotel located a block from the Conference Center. 


The first International Marine Conservation Congress was held on 20-24 May 2009 at George Mason University near Washington D.C.  The meeting brought over 1,200 scientists, managers and policy-makers together, with over 16 simultaneous conference sessions, symposia and workshops, and over a twenty associated events, training sessions and activities, making it one of the largest academic marine conservation conferences ever held.